Service Stories: Still looking for a summer service opportunity?

Thursday, Feb 15, 2018
by Isabel Ruehl '20

If so, look no further! These two programs—the Guggenheim Internships in Criminal Justice and the John C. Bogle ’51 Fellows in Civic Service—are just a sampling of what the Pace Center has to offer. Be sure to check out the Internships & Fellowships section for a complete list.

Guggenheim Internships in Criminal Justice: Due TODAY (February 16) at 5 p.m.!

If you’re interested in issues surrounding criminal justice, a Guggenheim internship may be right for you. (Note the tight application deadline!)

The Guggenheim program places students in a New York City-based criminal justice nonprofit and provides them with stipends. The goal of this internship is for “students to develop a real-world understanding of legal issues in criminal justice, to learn about policy innovations, and to consider future careers or further education in fields related to criminal justice.”

Guggenheim interns work with a range of nonprofits, such as the Brooklyn Defender Services to the Vera Institute of Justice. Interns’ experiences are complemented by seminars, which meet three to four times during the course of the internship. Additionally, interns must contribute to an online discussion board, and one day during the internship, students travel to a correctional facility in order to better understand the experience of incarceration. At the end of their respective programs, students wrap up their summer with a final written reflection. 

“One of the most important things that I learned during my Guggenheim internship was to challenge the messages that are often transmitted in the media and other outlets about individuals who are involved in the criminal justice system." - Charlotte Champ '20

As part of the Guggenheim program, Charlotte Champ ’20 interned last summer at the Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services (CASES), a non-profit Alternatives to Incarceration (ATI) provider in New York City. She describes the experience as “enlightening,” urging all interested students to apply. It is open to all years except seniors.

“One of the most important things that I learned during my Guggenheim internship was to challenge the messages that are often transmitted in the media and other outlets about individuals who are involved in the criminal justice system,” Charlotte said. “Particularly since I was around the same age as the participants, I found that in many cases we had far more in common than an outsider would predict. Getting to know participants personally and hearing their stories was a very human experience, and one that led me to question the narratives that are often presented about people in similar situations.”

Interviews are conducted in early March, with offers made by the end of the month. Additionally, the Pace Center will notify applicants if their application materials are forwarded to their respective New York nonprofits. Princeton students are not the only students applying; Guggenheim-affiliated organizations split internship positions between Princeton, Columbia, and Barnard.

The application consists of an online form, brief personal statement and a resume. 

John C. Bogle ’51 Fellows in Civic Service: Due February 23 at 5 p.m.

This program is offered exclusively to first-years—so if you’re a member of the Class of 2021, and you’re passionate about civic engagement, look no further! 

The Bogle Fellowship provides students with $4,500 to pursue a service-related project. Students have tremendous freedom in choosing and designing it: The project may be organized through a host partner organization, such as a nonprofit, or it may be completely independent. Whichever route the applicant chooses to take, students must provide a thorough description of this project in their online application.

Students must also find a supervisor with whom to collaborate. This person may be a Princeton faculty member or a member of the partner organization. Additionally, supervisors are encouraged to submit a letter of commitment as part of the application process. 

“I grew immensely in my understanding of the barriers people face when trying to escape poverty and in my videography skills, but the most important thing I think I gained from this project was getting to truly see the humanity of poverty." - Adam Beasley '20

Bogle projects must be a minimum of eight weeks long, during which time students also complete online written reflections. In the spring, the Bogle cohort must take part in the Pace Center Spring Leader Intensive (April 14) and meet for occasional fellowship dinners during the spring and fall semesters. Everything is arranged and guided by the program’s staff adviser, Kira O’Brien.

Jennie Yang ’20 praised the Bogle community, saying that she got to know the Fellows on a far deeper level than just their “common drive to serve.”

“It helps that Kira puts together amazing workshops and encourages us to think critically about our values and character among other things,” Jennie added. Her favorite group activity was a lunch with John Bogle ’51 himself, the fellowship’s namesake.

Another fellow, Adam Beasley ’20, partnered with CitySquare in Dallas, Texas, to produce a multi-video project that documented poverty and how it affects many who live in North Texas. 

“I grew immensely in my understanding of the barriers people face when trying to escape poverty and in my videography skills, but the most important thing I think I gained from this project was getting to truly see the humanity of poverty,” he said.

Finally, as if both these immersive summer learning experiences weren’t enough, both Bogle fellows and Guggeneheim interns are eligible to take part in Service Focus - a new University program that bridges service and learning across the first two years of the student experience. 

Not sure if either of these opportunities is right for you? Reach out to the following students!

Guggenheim Internships in Criminal Justice:
Charlotte Champ (cchamp@princeton.edu), 2020
Nathan Poland (npoland@princeton.edu), 2020

John C. Bogle '51 Fellows in Civic Service:
Jennie Yang (jlyang@princeton.edu), 2020
Adam Beasley (abeasley@princeton.edu), 2020