The John C. Bogle ‘51 Fellows in Civic Service program (Bogle Fellowship) is a funded opportunity open to Princeton first-year students. The fellowship was developed to support student participation in service or civic engagement pursuits during the summer before sophomore year. 

Bogle Fellows design their own summer internship or project in collaboration with a host partner and support of Pace staff. Internships must be a minimum of eight weeks and take place in the contiguous United States. International students are welcome to apply for funding to complete service projects or internships in their home countries.

Up to 20 first-year students will be granted awards of $4,500, with additional top-up funding available on an application basis.  

In the spring, Bogle Fellows will participate in training and fellowship dinners to prepare them for their summer experiences. As a part of their fellowship, Bogle Fellows will develop relationships with faculty members, who may provide fellows with additional guidance and insight.

Bogle Fellows can develop internships around any area of interest area within the realm of service and civic engagement. Projects tend to fall into one of three categories:

  • A traditional internship designed by an internship partner. For example: 
    • A position that an organization has posted a job description for
    • Research on campus with a faculty member
  • A project that a fellow has proposed and presented to an internship partner. For example:
    • Developing a curriculum for a youth program
    • Creating a video project to promote an agency’s mission
  • A project entirely designed and implemented by a fellow. For example:
    • Developing a new resource or product

Princeton University respects and protects the privacy of your personal data.  Student privacy rights are governed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), as described in Section 2.7 of Rights, Rules, Responsibilities.  Additional regulation is now in place around collecting personal information from students while in the European Union (EU). Please review more on the European Union’s (“EU’s”) General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”).

Learn

Trainings/Workshops
Allyship Through Service and Mutual Aid

Gain the skills, knowledge and tools to be able to practice and model forms of allyship and take part in mutual aid networks.

Service
Publications/Guides
Be In the Service of Humanity

When we examine how our values intersect, we gain insight into how we can use commonalities or differences to deepen our service and civic engagement and move forward. 

Service
Publications/Guides
Building Your Team

Acts of service and civic engagement are only made stronger when folks come together, combine their assets, and work toward a common vision.

Preparation
Publications/Guides
Community Assessment

Taking time to understand the issue your plan to work on and how it manifests in real time for the community is crucial to developing a successful, meaningful, and sustainable effort.

Preparation
Publications/Guides
Effective Communication

Effective communication can help you build a strong rapport with others and generate support for your work while starting a dialogue about this issues you are passionate about.

Service
Trainings/Workshops
Engage at Home

Learn about mutual aid networks, how to plug into community needs in your town, and where to find virtual volunteer opportunities.

Preparation
Service